not without mustard :: book series

Book Series

Last revision: 5 October 2018.

Amsterdam University Press

Early Modern Court Studies

Editors

Erin Griffey, Vanessa De Cruz, Luc Duerloo, Jemma Field, Liesbeth Geevers, Tim McCall

The early modern court in Europe was a political and cultural powerhouse and a hotbed of confessional intrigue, factional rivalry and international diplomacy. With a potent confluence of power, prestige and capital, the court set the tone for cultural innovation and fashions, provided for large numbers of people in food, board, wages and/or perquisites, while also being responsible for safeguarding the nation’s security. Yet no court operated in isolation. The maintenance of international relations through kinship ties, treaties and alliances were crucial to dynastic success as the courts vied with one another on the highly politicized stage of European monarchy. Early Modern Court Studies encourages rigorous, fresh examination on any aspect of court culture: political, military and social history; confessional identity and relationships with the church and monasteries/nunneries; court chapels and religious rituals; diplomacy, ritual and ceremonial; courtly retinues and household staff; visual and material culture; patronage, collecting and display; gender, sexuality, marriage, domesticity; architecture, furniture, interior decoration and garden design; clothing, jewelry and regalia; music; food and banquets; letter writing, diaries and personal and ambassadorial accounts; drama and dance; hygiene, medicine and beauty; the senses and emotions. It invites proposals on individual courts and comparative studies, both monographs and essay collections, and encourages cross-disciplinary work and the publication of transcriptions and translations of primary sources within the context of these studies.

Submissions

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles. For questions or to submit a proposal, contact the Commissioning Editor, Erika Gaffney (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Environmental Humanities in Pre-Modern Cultures

Editors

Gillian Overing, Heide Estes, Philip Slavin, Steven Mentz

This series in environmental humanities offers approaches to medieval, early modern, and global pre-industrial cultures from interdisciplinary environmental perspectives. We invite submissions (both monographs and edited collections) in the fields of ecocriticism, specifically ecofeminism and new ecocritical analyses of under-represented literatures; queer ecologies; posthumanism; waste studies; environmental history; environmental archaeology; animal studies and zooarchaeology; landscape studies; 'blue humanities', and studies of environmental / natural disasters and change and their effects on pre-modern cultures. We invite scholars at any stage of their careers to share their book proposals and draft manuscripts with us. Publications that make connections between environmental issues in pre-industrial cultures and current issues in sustainability, environmental policy, climate change, and human-nature interactions are especially welcome.

Submissions

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles. For questions or to submit a proposal, contact Commissioning Editors Ilse Schweitzer (ilse.schweitzer@arc-humanities.org) and Erika Gaffney (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Gendering the Late Medieval and Early Modern World

Editors

James Daybell, Victoria Burke, Svante Norrhem, Merry Weisner-Hanks

This series provides a forum for studies that investigate the themes of women and gender in the late medieval and early modern world. The editors invite proposals for book-length studies of an interdisciplinary nature, including but not exclusively, from the fields of history, literature, art and architectural history, and visual and material culture. Consideration will be given to both monographs and collections of essays. Chronologically, we welcome studies that look at the period between 1400 and 1700, with a focus on Britain, Europe and Global transnational histories. We invite proposals including, but not limited to, the following broad themes: methodologies, theories and meanings of gender; gender, power and political culture; monarchs, courts and power; construction of femininity and masculinities; gift-giving, diplomacy and the politics of exchange; gender and the politics of early modern archives and architectural spaces (court, salons, household); consumption and material culture; objects and gendered power; women's writing; gendered patronage and power; gendered activities, behaviours, rituals and fashions.

Submissions

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles. For questions or to submit a proposal, contact the Commissioning Editor, Erika Gaffney (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Maritime Humanities, 1400–1800: Cultures of the Sea

Editors

Claire Jowitt, John McAleer

Early modern oceans not only provided temperate climates, resources, and opportunities for commercial exchange, they also played a central role in cultural life. Increased exploration, travel, and trade, marked this period of history, and early modern seascapes were cultural spaces and contact zones, where connections and circulations occurred outside established centres of control and the dictates of individual national histories. Likewise, coastlines, rivers, and ports were all key sites for commercial and cultural exchange. Interdisciplinary in its approach, Maritime Humanities, 1400–1800: Cultures of the Sea welcomes books from across the full range of humanities subjects, and invites submissions that conceptually engage with issues of globalization, post-colonialism, eco-criticism, environmentalism, and the histories of science and technology. The series puts maritime humanities at the centre of a transnational historiographical scholarship that seeks to transform traditional land-based histories of states and nations by focusing on the cultural meanings of the early modern ocean. The series welcomes scholarly monographs and edited volumes in English by both established and early-career researchers.

Submissions

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles. For questions or to submit a proposal, contact the Commissioning Editor, Erika Gaffney (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Visual and Material Culture, 1300–1700

Editor

Allison Levy

A forum for innovative research on the role of images and objects in the late medieval and early modern periods, Visual and Material Culture, 1300-1700 publishes monographs and essay collections that combine rigorous investigation with critical inquiry to present new narratives on a wide range of topics, from traditional arts to seemingly ordinary things. Recognizing the fluidity of images, objects, and ideas, this series fosters cross-cultural as well as multi-disciplinary exploration. We consider proposals from across the spectrum of analytic approaches and methodologies. The series welcomes scholarly monographs and edited volumes in English by both established and early-career researchers.

Submissions

Proposals for monographs or edited volumes should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles. For questions or to submit a proposal, contact the Commissioning Editor, Erika Gaffney (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Anthem Press

The Circulation of Ideas in Text and Print Media, 1300-1900

Editor

Sandro Jung

The series welcomes historical investigations (in the form of single-authored monographs and edited collections of essays) of the great range of text technologies that authors and the various agents of textual production (including typesetters, engravers, printers, and visual artists) utilised from the Middle Ages to the late nineteenth century to promote, give shape to, and mediate particular ideas and concepts. Each volume should be framed by a research question that revolves around the importance of text technologies for the dissemination and promotion of ideas while embedding investigations within the multifarious contexts of the media economy of the time under consideration. The series encourages in particular studies that focus on visual culture (paintings, book illustrations, print), the intersection of the verbal text with material culture (designs visualising texts on furniture, fabric, ceramics), and examinations of intermediality. The study of hybrid text technologies, involving the concurrent use of text and images, as well as their design and (material) packaging, are of interest, as are studies that focus on the empirical recovery of reading experience on the basis of investigations of text objects and the technologies that made possible their production.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance and fill out the book proposal form.

Anthem Publishing Studies

Editors

Tej P.S. Sood, Adriaan van der Weel

The Anthem Publishing Studies series publishes high-quality research, innovative guidebooks and trenchant trade titles exploring publishing and the book trade at large: the authors, editors, publishers, booksellers and librarians who together produce, disseminate and preserve the world's knowledge and culture through books, periodicals and digital media. Publishing is changing as never before and this series aims to document and push forward this unique period in publishing history. These works address general, professional, student and academic audiences through their relevance, rigour and readability, and serve as a critical interchange for all participants in the book world – creators and consumers alike. Anybody who cares about the future of books, publishing and media will benefit from this path-breaking series.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance and fill out the book proposal form.

Anthem Scholarship in the Digital Age

Editors

Paul Arthur, Willard McCarty, Patrik Svensson

Anthem Scholarship in the Digital Age investigates the global impact of technology and computing on knowledge and society. Tracing transformations in communication, learning and research, the groundbreaking titles in this series demonstrate the far-reaching effects of the digital revolution across disciplines, cultures and languages.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance and fill out the book proposal form.

Anthem Studies in Book History, Publishing and Print Culture

Editor

David Carter

The series publishes original, high-quality research in all areas relating to the history of the book, publishing and the book trade, copyright and cultural policy, reading practices, the circulation of print media, and digital and screen media and their wider impact. We have a special interest in studies of modern print cultures, in postcolonial and transnational contexts, and in intersections between book history/print culture studies and cultural/media studies.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance and fill out the book proposal form.

ARC Humanities Press

Borderlines

Editors

CARMEN Publications Committee

Borderlines welcomes monographs and edited collections that, while firmly rooted in late antique, medieval and early modern periods, are "edgy" and may introduce approaches, methodologies or theories from the social sciences, health studies, and the sciences. Typically, volumes are theoretically aware whilst introducing novel approaches to topics of key interest to scholars of the pre-modern past. Publications of conventional length (70,000 to 110,000) as well as short-form (45,000 to 60,000) are accepted. Borderlines launches a third pillar of content for Arc Humanities Press (beyond the original two pillars of the global past, and social impact research and applied research into the past). It reinforces one of CARMEN's key aims, namely to foster research links beyond the humanities. The series therefore operates under the auspices of the CARMEN Publications Committee.

Submissions

Contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Connected Histories in the Early Modern World

Editors

Christina Lee, Julia Schleck

Connected Histories in the Early Modern World contributes to our growing understanding of the connectedness of the world during a period in history when an unprecedented number of people—Africans, Asians, Americans, and Europeans—made transoceanic or other long distance journeys. Inspired by Sanjay Subrahmanyam's innovative approach to early modern historical scholarship, it explores topics that highlight the cultural impact of the movement of people, animals, and objects at a global scale. The series editors welcome proposals for monographs and collections of essays in English from literary critics, art historians, and cultural historians that address the changes and cross-fertilizations of cultural practices of specific societies. General topics may concern, among other possibilities: cultural confluences, objects in motion, appropriations of material cultures, cross-cultural exoticization, transcultural identities, religious practices, translations and mistranslations, cultural impacts of trade, discourses of dislocation, globalism in literary/visual arts, and cultural histories of lesser studied regions (such as the Philippines, Macau, African societies).

Submissions

Contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Early Social Performance

Editor

Pam King

This series addresses a gap in the market by publishing monographs, themed collections of essays, and editions relating to performance in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period (c. 300-1700 CE) that includes, but is not confined to, drama, visual art, music, and dance. It addresses those areas of social performance which slip down the conventional disciplinary cracks, such as processions, tournaments, proclamations, and other courtly, civic, and rural ritual practices. It will also consider treatments of, for instance, clothing, poetry, architecture, sport, story-telling, and any other human social activity which can be construed as performative. (Continues MIP series, Early Drama, Art and Music?)

Submissions

Contact Pam King, Series Editor, on kingpm@btinternet.com or Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Gender and Power in the Premodern World

Editors

Elena Woodacre, Carole Levin, Simon Doubleday, Susan Broomhall

Gender and Power in the Premodern World aims to showcase cutting‐edge research into issues of gender and power across a broad temporal and geographic spectrum. It will fill key lacunae in the field, broadening conversations about gender and power by addressing constructions and performances of masculinity as well as engaging with women’s roles, expanding beyond a European framework of analysis, and breaking down conventional barriers between premodern periods. It will examine not only rulers and elites in positions of political or religious authority but also others who exerted power in economic, cultural, and symbolic forms. While the series has a basis in historical and gender studies, other forms of interdisciplinary work are welcomed, as are submissions in art history, literary studies, and the history of emotions. Put simply, this series aims to increase our understanding of the relationship between gender and power by offering a unique space between the strictures of the short article and the full-length work to explore specific figures and issues, engage in comparative studies and contribute to debates in the field. The books will be typically 45‐60,000 words long and priced more affordably with Open Access options. Monographs are welcome too.

Submissions

Contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Medieval Media Cultures

Editors

Toby Burrows, Dorothy Kim, Richard Utz

Medieval Media Cultures offers analyses of how individuals interacted with written, visual, dramatic, and material media in medieval and early modern cultures, as well as how modern scholars interact with the remnants of medieval and early modern cultures via written, material, and now digital and electronic media. This new series in media literacy welcomes proposals for monographs and essay collections in the fields of digital humanities, mapping, digital text analysis, games and gaming studies, literacy studies, and text production and interaction. We are especially interested in projects that demonstrate how digital methods and tools for research, preservation, and presentation influence the ways in which we interact with and understand these texts and media.

Submissions

The series welcomes submissions of conventional monograph length (70,000 words upwards) and short-form publications (45,000 to 60,000 words). In keeping with the topic, publications can be heavily illustrated, including in colour, and rapid turn-rounds are offered to ensure that cutting-edge research is available within eight months of the post-peer-reviewed manuscript having been delivered. Contact the Acquisitions Editor, Ilse Schweitzer VanDonkelaar (ilse.schweitzer@arc-humanities.org).

Recreational Shakespeare

Editors

Michael P. Jensen, Jeffrey Kahan

The Recreational Shakespeare series seeks to define the ways our understanding of and responses to Shakespeare's work have undergone important transformations in the past and in our postmodern, digital age. Recreational Shakespeare examines con-temporary forms of media performance—radio, graphic novels, "fan fiction," loose novelistic adaptations, blogs, horror movies, internet parodies, YouTube memes, avant-garde internet podcasts, and more—to discover how these iterations refresh and revitalize Shakespeare. Recreational Shakespeare addresses questions such as: what kinds of new stories can users generate from the Shakespearean text? How much meaning do these re-creations bear without becoming overly heavy, eccentric, or sentimental and what new meanings appear when old texts are renewed though modern minds? Where exactly do we find the intersection of "Shakespeare" and "popular" culture, and how can these intersections change our already complex orientation towards authorship, adaptation, and appropriation? New Shakespeare works are often used recreationally, consumed for fun during leisure time. What can we determine about recreational consumers? What makes artifacts fun, illuminating, and sometimes even collectable? What are the characteristics of a Shakespeare fan? When is recreated Shakespeare a mere recreation and when is it something more traditionally "respectable"? At what points and under what conditions do all of these taxonomies break down?

Submissions

Contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor (erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Bloomsbury

Arden Early Modern Drama Guides

Editors

Andrew Hiscock and Lisa Hopkins

Arden Early Modern Drama Guides offer practical and accessible introductions to the critical and performative contexts of key Elizabethan and Jacobean plays. Each guide introduces the text's critical and performance history but also provides students with an invaluable insight into the landscape of current scholarly research through a keynote essay on the state of the art and newly commissioned essays of fresh research from different critical perspectives.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance.

Arden Studies in Early Modern Drama

Editors

Lisa Hopkins, Tanya Pollard

Arden Studies in Early Modern Drama offers fresh approaches to the plays of Shakespeare's contemporaries, or studies that put Shakespeare in dialogue with other playwrights of the period. The series does not seek to privilege any particular theoretical position but accommodates a range of new perspectives on how these plays work and why they still matter. Above all the series makes available new writing, including from emerging scholars, which is energised by the insights produced by recent editorial work on the plays and by enquiries and experiments into how they can work on the stage and what the effects of original performance conditions might be.

Submissions

Email the publisher, Margaret Bartley, in the first instance: Margaret.Bartley@bloomsbury.com

Arden Shakespeare Studies in Language and Digital Methodologies

Editors

Jonathan Hope, Lynne Magnusson, Michael Witmore

The series aims to identify, develop, and publish new work on Shakespeare and his contemporaries with a focus on language and/or digital methods. We are open to work on language which is not primarily digital, and to digital or quantitative work which is not linguistic. We have brought them together because they share objects of interest, methodologies, and often practitioners, and because their intersection has opened new paths in research. We are also open to work which is non-traditional in length (shorter than a monograph, longer than an article) and format. We welcome experimentation. A key feature of the series is the way we work with authors to develop ideas and publishable pieces.

Submissions

Contact the series editors (above) or the publisher, Margaret Bartley.

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare

Submissions

Email the publisher, Margaret Bartley, in the first instance: Margaret.Bartley@bloomsbury.com

Shakespeare and Theory

Editor

Evelyn Gajowski

Submissions

Contact the editor in the first instance.

Shakespeare Now!

Editors

Ewan Fernie, Simon Palfrey

Shakespeare Now! is a series of short books that engage imaginatively and often provocatively with the possibilities of Shakespeare's plays. It goes back to the source -- the most living language imaginable -- and recaptures the excitement, audacity and surprise of Shakespeare. It will return you to the plays with opened eyes.

Submissions

Contact the editors in the first instance.

Boydell & Brewer

Studies in Renaissance Literature

Editors

David Colclough, Raphael Lyne, Sean Keilen

Studies in Renaissance Literature offers investigations of topics in English literature focussed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, taking a wide range of critical approaches; its scope extends from early Tudor writing, including works reflecting medieval concerns, to the Restoration period. Studies exploring the interplay between the literature of the English Renaissance and its cultural history are particularly welcomed.

Submissions

Submit a proposal.

Brepols

Cursor Mundi

Editor

Blair Sullivan

Cursor Mundi is a publication series of inter- and multi-disciplinary studies of the medieval and early modern world, viewed broadly as the period between late antiquity and the Enlightenment. Like its companion, the journal Viator, Cursor Mundi brings together outstanding work by medieval and early modern scholars from a wide range of disciplines, emphasizing studies which focus on processes such as cultural exchange or the course of an idea through the centuries, and including investigations beyond the traditional boundaries of Europe and the Mediterranean. Cursor Mundi is published under the auspices of the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to Blair Sullivan (sullivan@humnet.ucla.edu).

Early European Research

Editors

Claire McIlroy, Andrew Lynch

Early European Research is a series that explores how the social and intellectual history of pre-modern Europe both shapes and challenges contemporary Western society. Its publications consider issues such as: models of individual and collective identity; gender and power structures; conflict, peace and war; social capital and poverty; changing approaches to science and medicine, and ways of treating the environment and alien cultures.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisitions Editor, Guy Carney (guy.carney@brepols.net).

Early Modern Cultural Studies

Editor

Blair Sullivan

Early Modern Cultural Studies is a peer-reviewed book series of Brepols Publishers that explores the complexities of the early modern world. Early modernity is broadly conceived as the period from around 1300 to 1700. With our international editorial board, we welcome monographs and edited volumes that shed new light on and adopt new approaches to the histories and cultural products of this period. The thematic scope allows works in this series to investigate trends and events in cultural, intellectual, social, political, and economic history which are indicative both of change and continuity with the past. The series thus covers issues ranging from (but not limited to) gender, identity, society, emotions, space, material culture, religion, and politics and their intersections. We accommodate books rich in illustrations and are particularly interested in studies in art and architectural history. The series is published under the auspices of the Centre for Reformation & Renaissance Studies, University of Toronto.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Chief Editor, Dr Joanna Ludwikowska (crrs.emcs@vicu.utoronto.ca).

Late Medieval and Early Modern Studies

Editors

Ian Moulton, Frederick Kiefer, Stephanie Trigg, Charles Zika

Jointly directed by scholars from the University of Melbourne and the Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, this series covers the historical period in Western and Central Europe from c.1300 to c.1650. It concentrates on topics of broad cultural, religious, intellectual and literary history. The editors are particularly interested in studies that are distinguished by their broad chronological range; their spanning of time periods such as late medieval, Renaissance, Reformation, early modern; their straddling of national borders and historiographies; and their cross-disciplinary approach.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance.

Proteus: Studies in Early Modern Identity Formation

Editor

Todd M. Richardson

Recent developments in a variety of historical disciplines have begun to re-evaluate the concept of self and identity in the early-modern period (1350-1650). Rather than thinking of self to be a discrete, static entity, we now understand it to be formed and re-formed in a continual, dynamic process. Proteus examines the social and cultural practices by which the construction of the inner self and the performance of outer identity were inseparably bound to one another. (The series publishes monographs and essay collections.)

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Series Editor, Todd M. Richardson (tmrchrds@memphis.edu) and/or the Acquisitions Editor, Guy Carney (guy.carney@brepols.net).

Texts and Transitions

Editors

Martha Driver, Derek Pearsall

Texts and Transitions: Studies in the History of Manuscripts and Printed Books is based on the ideals and aims of the Early Book Society. It publishes monographs and thematic collections dealing with late medieval manuscripts and early printed books to about 1550. The focus is mainly on manuscripts and books produced in England or for the English market, and closely related French and north-west European works.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisitions Editor, Guy Carney (guy.carney@brepols.net).

Brill

Catholic Christendom, 1300–1700

Editors

Giorgio Caravale, Ralph Keen, J. Christopher Warner

Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700 is devoted to the study of any and all expressions of traditional religion and varieties of religious behavior in the 'Catholic world' of the late medieval and early modern periods. The interests of the series are comparative and non-confessional, extending beyond institutional church history and the history of religious thought to include social and cultural history, art history, literary history, the history of the book, the history of science, the history of late medieval and early modern western Christianity in a global context, and above all, interdisciplinary combinations of these and other critical methodologies. (Note: this series was previously published by Ashgate until it was acquired by Routledge in 2015.)

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Reformation and Renaissance, and book history: Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Costerus

Editors

C.C. Barfoot, Michael Boyden, Theo D'haen, Raphaël Ingelbien, Birgit Neumann

Costerus is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s). Besides the more classical research in English, American and Irish literature, we offer a platform for new directions in literary studies in relation to translation studies, minority literatures, ecology, medical humanities, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies, network studies and social sciences, as well as reflections on studies in English literature as a discipline. All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for English and comparative literatures: Masja Horn, horn@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Drama and Theatre in Early Modern Europe

Editor

Jan Bloemendal

Drama and Theatre in Early Modern Europe is a peer-reviewed series on topics in early modern forms of theatre, theatricality and drama. Contributions may come from any of the disciplines within the humanities, such as theatre studies, musicology, literary history, art history, book history, church history, social history, cultural history, and history of ideas. The series aims to open up new areas of research or new approaches to early modern drama. It publishes monographs, collections of essays and key text editions.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Explorations in Medieval Culture

Editor

Larissa Tracy

A peer-reviewed book series that provides a forum for investigations of aspects of the medieval world from a textual and cultural perspective, using an interdisciplinary approach. This series examines a varied range of social and cultural issues like language, identity, monstrosity, gender, race, religion, injustice, medical treatment, death, and grief through the whole medieval period, ca. 600–1500, including early modern and modern medievalisms and responses to the Middle Ages. Innovative and interesting cultural and intertextual studies from all geographical regions of the medieval world are welcome. The series will contain monographs, edited volumes, and critical editions and other works of reference.

Submissions

Queries and submissions may be sent to the Series Editor, Larissa Tracy, tracylc@longwood.edu or the Acquisition Editor for medieval studies, Kate Hammond, hammond@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Intersections: Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Modern Culture

Editor

K.A.E. Enenkel

Intersections is a peer-reviewed series on interdisciplinary topics in early modern studies. Contributions may come from any of the disciplines within the humanities, such as history, art history, literary history, book history, church history, social history, cultural history, and history of ideas. Each volume focuses on a single theme and consists of essays that explore new perspectives on the subject of study. The series aims to open up new areas of research on early modern culture and to address issues of interest to a wide range of disciplines.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

The Library of the Written Word is an international peer-reviewed book series that publishes monographs, edited volumes, source materials and bibliographies on a variety of subjects, related to the history of the book, magazines and newspapers. The series consists of three subseries, each one covering a particular period: The Manuscript World, The Handpress World, and The Industrial World. The series invites studies in codicology, palaeography, typography, economic history of the trade and the technology of printing. Analytical bibliographies as well as editions of key sources can be included, and studies on the cultural and political role and impact of the written word are also welcome. Where possible, the economic aspects of the book trade should be included in studies published in this series.

The Manuscript World

Editor

Richard Gameson

The Manuscript World investigates the forms, functions and impact of books, individually and collectively, in their cultural contexts, from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Extending from the era of roll books, through that of the monastic scriptorium and then on, via the age of professional scribes and illuminators serving scholars and princes, to the point when manuscript-makers were responding to the challenge of printing, this long period embraces a sequence of profound changes in the nature of the book. The Manuscript World accordingly explores the many roles of the hand-written book in all its manifestations, across more than a millennium of human history.

The Handpress World

Editor

Andrew Pettegree

The Handpress World explores the impact of the invention of printing by moveable type from the first experiments of the incunabula age through to the end of the eighteenth century. In this crucial period of book history the new technology both transformed established markets for scholarly and religious literature and found a new public through the rise of the pamphlet and later the newspaper. The series will investigate every aspect of this cultural transformation, from the promotion in print of the great intellectual movements of the day through to the birth of the public library.

The Industrial World

Editor

Michael B. Winship

The Industrial World is a peer-reviewed series that explores the ways that industrialization has shaped the production, distribution, and reception of books from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. This period is marked by the introduction of new technologies -- not just of manufacture, but also of transportation and communication -- that have profoundly altered the ways that books are created and circulated and that have, among other things, enabled the rise of international publishing conglomerates that can reach a global mass market. The series investigates every aspect of the book in the industrial world, from the reorganization of the book and publishing trades to the present impact of digital texts and the internet.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for book history, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Ludus: Medieval and Early Renaissance Theatre and Drama

Editors

Peter Happé, Wim Hüsken

Ludus intends to introduce those interested in literature, in the performing arts, or in history to the various aspects of theatre and drama from the Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance. It publishes books on closely defined topics, mostly seen from a comparative point of view.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Medieval and Renaissance Authors and Texts

Editor

Francis G. Gentry

Medieval and Renaissance Authors and Texts is a peer-reviewed book series focusing on the authors and the Latin and vernacular literatures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance (ca. 6th through 16th centuries), including those less common literatures that arose within the European cultural sphere. Volumes include original scholarly monographs, article collections, as well as editions of primary sources, and translations. All methodological approaches -- including interdisciplinary ones -- are welcome.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Philological Encounters Monographs

Editor

Islam Dayeh

Philogical Encounters Monographs is dedicated to the historical and philosophical critique of philology. The series encourages critical and comparative perspectives that integrate textual scholarship and the study of language from across the world. The series is open to contributions in all fields studying the history of textual practices, hermeneutics and philology, philological controversies, and the intellectual and global history of writing, archiving, tradition-making and publishing. Neither confined to any discipline nor bound by any geographical or temporal limits, the series takes as its point of departure the growing concern with the global significance of philology and the potential of historically conscious and politically critical philology to challenge exclusivist notions of the self and the canon. Philogical Encounters Monographs is a supplement to the journal Philogical Encounters.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

RSA Texts and Studies Series

Editor

Ingrid De Smet

The Renaissance Society of America Texts and Studies Series (RSA-TS) is a peer-reviewed (refereed) series that has as its focus the Latin and vernacular cultures of late medieval and early modern Europe (ca. 1300–1700), including those less common literatures that arose within the European cultural sphere. The series publishes editions of primary sources, translations in combination with critical editions, and thematic reference works ("Companions" or similar) of enduring value, for which a printed volume is the appropriate medium. Books in the series are simultaneously produced in electronic format.

Submissions

Note: submitters should be "RSA members in good standing". Queries and submissions may be sent to the Editor in Chief, Ingrid De Smet, i.de-smet@warwick.ac.uk in the first instance. See instructions to authors/editors.

Scholarly Communication

Editors

Adriaan van der Weel, Ernst D. Thoutenhoofd, Ray Siemens

Brill's Scholarly Communication offers a new venue for original studies into the mutual shaping of reading, writing and scholarship in the past, present and future. It also welcomes manuscripts that interrogate this mutual shaping with respect to science. The series aims to bring together insights into the literate nature of scholarship and scholarly activity from across the entire spectrum of social sciences and humanities disciplines, emphasizing work aimed at understanding change in reading, writing and scholarship. The focus in this series is less on disciplinary specificities than it is on topical and imaginative contributions to scholarly literacy in the widest sense. English is presupposed.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Reformation and Renaissance, and book history: Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions

Editor

Andrew Colin Gow

Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions is a peer-reviewed book series that provides a forum for monographs and text editions on subjects pertaining to the watershed between the Middle Ages and the Reformation. There is a wealth of subject matter to be found in the correlation and mutual interpretation of all three areas of specialization -- Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation studies. In encouraging the pursuit of the social history of ideas, Studies in Medieval and Reformation Traditions pays equal attention to political, cultural and religious history.

Submissions

Please direct inquiries to the Acquisition Editor for early modern studies, Reformation and Renaissance, and book history: Arjan van Dijk, dijk@brill.com. See also Publishing with Brill.

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge Studies in Publishing and Printing History

Editors

Terry Belanger, David McKitterick

This series encompasses books on aspects of publishing and printing history -- on the impact of print and the means by which the printed word was prepared for public consumption -- from Caxton to the present day. Over the next few years volumes will appear on topics ranging from book production in the fifteenth century to the exploitation of mass-market fiction in the nineteenth century. There will also be major editions of correspondence between authors and publishers. All are important for students of literature and cultural history as well as for bibliographers and historians of publishing and printing.

Submissions

Contact Emily Hockley, Acquisitions Editor for Literature, in the first instance: ehockley@cambridge.org. See also information for authors.

Elements in Publishing and Book Culture

Editors

Samantha J. Rayner, Rebecca Lyons

N/A

Submissions

Contact Emily Hockley, Acquisitions Editor for Literature, in the first instance: ehockley@cambridge.org. See also information for authors.

Elements in Shakespeare Performance

Editor

W.B. Worthen

Elements in Shakespeare Performance emphasizes scholarship with direct bearing on contemporary Shakespeare performance: specific performances; material and social practices; ideological and cultural contexts; emerging or significant artists. The series seeks a wide range of analytic commentary, and indeed commentary not only on a diversity of current productions, and analysis of earlier productions that bear directly on the critical, ideological, and practical landscape of performance today, but also on how performance itself can provide a mode of inquiry. Rather than defining a narrow range of topics, as a traditional publishing series might do, Elements in Shakespeare Performance instead encourages essays across the wide range of historical and contemporary Shakespeare performance. That said, it is important to underline that we encourage essays to consider Shakespeare performance broadly, in any medium, including written media, and understand performance as both an object of analysis, and also as an instrument of analysis, a participant in a dialogic critical process. Note: titles in the series will be concise (20,0000–30,000 words in length), updatable (annually), and available in HTML, PDF, and print.

Submissions

Contact Emily Hockley, Acquisitions Editor for Literature, in the first instance: ehockley@cambridge.org. See also information for authors.

De Gruyter

Anglia Book Series

Editors

Lucia Kornexl, Ursula Lenker, Martin Middeke, Gabriele Rippl, Hubert Zapf

The Anglia Book Series (ANGB) offers a selection of high quality work on all areas and aspects of English philology. It publishes book-length studies and essay collections on English language and linguistics, on English and American literature and culture from the Middle Ages to the present, on the new English literatures, as well as on general and comparative literary studies, including aspects of cultural and literary theory.

Submissions

Contact Dr Ulrike Krauss, Senior Acquisitions Editor for English and American Studies, in the first instance: ulrike.krauss@degruyter.com. See also production information.

Fundamentals of Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Editors

Albrecht Classen, Marilyn Sandidge

The aim of this English-language series on medieval studies is to establish a methodical, discerning connection between text analysis and cultural history. The series addresses the fundamental cultural themes of the medieval world from the perspective of literary studies and the humanities. These fundamental themes are the culture-formative conceptualizations, world views, social structures and everyday conditions of medieval life, namely, childhood and old age, sexuality, religion, medicine, rituals, work, poverty and wealth, superstition, earth and cosmos, city and country, war, emotions, communication, travel etc. Fundamentals of Medieval and Early Modern Culture pursues important current discussions in the field and provides a forum for interdisciplinary medieval research. The series is open to anthologies as well as monographs. The aim of the series is to present compendium-like works on the central topics of medieval cultural history that provide a sound overview of a limited subject area from the perspective of various disciplines. On the whole, the series thus presents an encyclopedia of medieval literary and cultural history and its main topics.

Submissions

Contact Dr Jacob Klingner (jacob.klingner@degruyter.com) and/or Dr Elisabeth Kempf (elisabeth.kempf@degruyter.com), Acquisitions Editors for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, in the first instance. See also production information.

Early Modern Center, University of California, Santa Barbara

EMC Imprint

Editors

Andrew Griffin, Elizabeth Heckendorn Cook, Patricia Fumerton, Ken Hiltner, James Kearney, Rachael King, David Marshall, Carl Stahmer, William Warner

The EMC Imprint was launched as a peer-reviewed publication by Patricia Fumerton, working with her colleague Andrew Griffin in the Early Modern Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The EMC Imprint as a peer-reviewed press is not only an innovation in digital publication intended to exploit the multiple media of the web. It is also an innovation in funding such publication. The Imprint ensures rigorous peer-review, a press affiliated with an internationally recognized Center, a sophisticated publication platform, and a co-ordinating editor to advise you in publishing your project. Whenever possible, we aid in the funding costs for additional web work or copy-editing, but we expect those who seek to publish in the Imprint to obtain a subvention from their institution to help with additional costs.

Submissions

Email the Lead Editor, Andrew Griffin (griffin@english.ucsb.edu) in the first instance. The EMC Imprint accepts proposals of 2-3 pp. for review by the Executive Board. If the Board agrees that the project is viable, and a member of the Board agrees to serve as Coordinating Editor for the publication, the contributor will be asked to provide a more detailed (7-10 pp.) prospectus for review by an outside scholar selected from the EMC's Advisory Board. On the advice of the reviewer and evidence that the contributor can help to support the publication costs, the production will proceed with the understanding that the reviewer will provide feedback for possible revision before publication.

Edinburgh University Press

Edinburgh Critical Studies in Renaissance Culture

Editor

Lorna Hutson

This is a series of solo-authored monographs on the interpretation of Renaissance culture, focusing primarily on the English Renaissance, but including work in a range of vernacular languages, as well as work on the reception and transformation of the Greco-Roman literary, political and intellectual heritage. To date, disciplinary divisions have tended to insulate critical interpretations of material culture from those of political and intellectual history, or of legal and political culture from the literary, or of religious discourse from, say, the development of economic thought. While New Historicism encouraged a turn to the material and social in literary interpretation, the promise of a 'poetics of culture' has been eclipsed by the Shakespeare industry, which continues to naturalize and universalize the object of study. This series will, by contrast, offer readers: interdisciplinary studies that involve close, detailed and sophisticated readings of Renaissance texts and cultural objects; explorations of hitherto unnoticed connections between the literary and the development of other areas of thought and discourse (for example, international law; natural philosophy; commerce and trade); theoretically informed interventions, which reflect critically on what modern critical theory itself owes to Renaissance culture; and, significant reinterpretations of both major and less well-known texts and genres of the period, and reassessments of the meaning of their cultural legacy.

Submissions

Email editorial@eup.ed.ac.uk.

Edinburgh Critical Studies in Shakespeare and Philosophy

Editor

Kevin Curran

Edinburgh Critical Studies in Shakespeare and Philosophy takes seriously the speculative and world-making properties of Shakespeare's art. Maintaining a broad view of "philosophy" that accommodates foundational questions of metaphysics, ethics, politics, and aesthetics, the series also expands our understanding of philosophy to include the unique kinds of theoretical work carried out by performance and poetry itself. These scholarly monographs will reinvigorate Shakespeare studies by opening new interdisciplinary conversations among scholars, artists, and students.

Submissions

Email editorial@eup.ed.ac.uk.

Renaissance Dramas and Dramatists

Editors

Sean McEvoy, David Abercrombie

An invaluable resource for all students of Elizabethan and Jacobean theatre, each volume in this series provides an authoritative and up-to-date survey of a Renaissance genre or major dramatist's work with a focus on the plays in performance. Each guide provides: An informative account of the writer's entire dramatic output, with an emphasis on those plays most frequently studied at university, college and school; detailed and relevant contextual information on history, culture, politics and biography; a lucid survey of important recent criticism; and original critical readings of the major plays.

Submissions

Email editorial@eup.ed.ac.uk.

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press

Shakespeare and the Stage

Editors

Peter Kanelos, Matthew Kozusko

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press has established a new Series devoted to publishing scholarly works on the theatrical dimensions of the plays of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. This Series works within and across the traditional disciplinary boundaries that have structured academic accounts of Shakespeare and performance. The series features both praxis-oriented and theoretical approaches to early modern drama in performance, and the editors encourage submissions treating the broad arc and legacy of Shakespeare, the critical reception of Shakespearean productions, and the afterlife of Shakespeare in the theater. The editors are soliciting proposals and manuscripts in the following areas: Early Modern theatrical practice, Shakespearean performance history, Shakespearean adaptations and appropriations, and stage-centered Shakespearean criticism. Both individual and edited collections of previously unpublished essays are welcome.

Submissions

Proposals and inquiries may be sent directly to the editors of this Series: peter.kanelos@valpo.edu and mkozusko@ursinus.edu

Leiden University Press

Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Book Culture

Editor

Erik Kwakkel

This series presents studies related to medieval manuscripts and early printed books. The scope is broad and includes the production and use of these books, their readers, and their physical appearance. An emphasis of the series is to discuss material features of the objects and to do so in relationship to the cultural-intellectual context of the period.

Submissions

Forward the proposal form by email to the publisher, Anniek Meinders, info@lup.nl.

Manchester University Press

The Manchester Spenser

Editors

Joshua Reid, Kathryn Walls, Tamsin Badcoe

The Manchester Spenser is a monograph and text series devoted to historical and textual approaches to Edmund Spenser – to his life, times, places, works and contemporaries. A growing body of work in Spenser and Renaissance studies, fresh with confidence and curiosity and based on solid historical research, is being written in response to a general sense that our ability to interpret texts is becoming limited without the excavation of further knowledge. So the importance of research in nearby disciplines is quickly being recognised, and interest renewed: history, archaeology, religious or theological history, book history, translation, lexicography, commentary and glossary – these require treatment for and by students of Spenser. The Manchester Spenser, to feed, foster and build on these refreshed attitudes, aims to publish reference tools, critical, historical, biographical and archaeological monographs on or related to Spenser, from several disciplines, and to publish editions of primary sources and classroom texts of a more wide-ranging scope. The Manchester Spenser consists of work with stamina, high standards of scholarship and research, adroit handling of evidence, rigour of argument, exposition and documentation. The series will encourage and assist research into, and develop the readership of, one of the richest and most complex writers of the Early Modern period.

Submissions

Email the Senior Commissioning Editor for Literature, Theatre and Film, Matthew Frost (m.frost@manchester.ac.uk).

Revels Plays Companion Library

Editors

Susan Brock, Susan Cerasano, Paul Edmondson, Grace Ioppolo

The aim of the Companion Library is to provide students of the Elizabethan and Jacobean drama with a fuller sense of its background and context. The series includes volumes of a variety of kinds. Small collections of plays, by a single author or concerned with a single theme and edited in accordance with the principles of textual modernisation of The Revels Plays, offer a wider range of drama than the main series can include. Together with editions of masques, pageants and the non-dramatic work of Elizabethan and Jacobean playwrights, these volumes make it possible, within the overall Revels enterprise, to examine the achievements of the major dramatists from a broader perspective.

Submissions

Email the Senior Commissioning Editor for Literature, Theatre and Film, Matthew Frost (m.frost@manchester.ac.uk).

Medieval Institute Publications (The University Press at Kalamazoo)

Early Drama, Art, and Music

Editor

Pam King

Early Drama, Art, and Music has an established reputation for publishing specialized high-quality scholarship through Medieval Institute Publications at Western Michigan University. The current editorial board interprets its core business in drama, art and music in very permissive ways that reflect current critical trends. The board seeks submissions from new as well as established scholars with an interest in, for example, performativity, rituals, somatic reception and medievalism, as well as in fresh departures in the study of plays, visual and plastic arts and music. The time is ripe for a more global reach, to expand the conventional Anglophone and Latin base into explorations of a wider range of traditions from medieval Europe and beyond.

Submissions

Proposals or completed manuscripts to be considered should be sent to the series editor, Pam King (kingpm@btinternet.com), University of Glasgow. Inquiries may also be directed to Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, Erika.Gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Late Tudor and Stuart Drama: Gender, Performance, and Material Culture

Editors

Cristina Leon Alfar, Helen Ostovich

This series provides a forum for monographs and essay collections that investigate the material culture, broadly conceived, of theatre and performance in England from the late Tudor to the pre-Restoration Stuart periods (c. 1550–1650). The editors invite proposals for book-length studies engaging in the material vitality of the dramatic text, political culture, theatre and performance history, theatrical design, performance spaces, gendering court entertainments, child- and adult-actors, music, dance, and audiences in London and on tour. We are also interested in the discursive production of gender, sex, and race in early modern England in relation to material historical, social, cultural, and political structures; changes to and effects of law; monarchy and the republic in dramatic texts; theatre and performance, including performance spaces that are not in theatres. Further topics might include the production and consumption of things and ideas; costumes, props, theatre records and accounts, gendering of spaces and geographies (court, tavern, street, and household, rural or urban), cross-dressing, military or naval excursions, gendered pastimes, games, behaviours, rituals, fashions, and encounters with the exotic, the non-European, the disabled, and the demonic and their reflection in text and performance.

Submissions

Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, Erika.Gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Ludic Cultures, 1100–1700

Editors

Bret Rothstein, Alessandro Arcangeli, Christina Normore

Ludic Cultures treats medieval and early modern play in all its innumerable eccentricities. Building on the work of Johan Huizinga, as well as that of Roger Caillois and Bernard Suits, these monographs and essay collections conceive of play as a phenomenon that extends well beyond leisure activities and child's play, finding expression in virtually every facet of cultural production. The series promotes the documentation of complex cultural practices that have thus far eluded traditional disciplinary models. These interdisciplinary works make visible varieties of thought and action that until recently seemed impossible to trace, while contributing to growing interest in what Huizinga once rightly called "the play element of culture." The series welcomes the submission of both monographs and essay collections that view cultures in Europe and the Americas between 1100 and 1700 through the lens of play.

Submissions

To submit a proposal or completed manuscript to be considered for publication by Medieval Institute Publications or to learn more about the series, please contact the acquisitions editor, Erika Gaffney (Erika.Gaffney@arc-humanities.org).

Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

Editors

Kathleen Perry Long, Luke Morgan

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; "monstrous" encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the "New Science"; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Submissions

Contact Erika Gaffney, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on erika.gaffney@arc-humanities.org.

Research in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Medieval Institute Publications publishes a monograph series, Research in Medieval and Early Modern Culture, and a sister series of edited collections, Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Culture. The series were originally inspired by themes drawn from the annual International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo. From 2016 the series explicitly opened themselves up to publications that wholly or partially focus on the early modern world. Hence the series titles changed from "in Medieval Culture" to "in Medieval and Early Modern Culture." Beginning in 2018, all books listed in RMEMC are also part of SMEMC. Research into the premodern world offers complex understandings of how cultural ideas, traditions, and practices are constructed, transferred, and disseminated among different agents and regions. Knowledge of the premodern past, in particular, helps us to contextualize contemporary debates about identity, integration, political legitimacy, creativity, and cultural dynamics. Understanding what it meant to be human in the premodern world is essential to understanding our present moment and our future trajectories. Current innovations in humanities research, employing digital tools for preservation, representation, and analysis, require us to return again to the earliest sources of our shared past, in the media and mentalities of the premodern world. This series provides a space for exploring what it has meant to be human through the ages, using literary, historical, and material sources and by employing innovative, popular, or interdisciplinary approaches. Publications are typically interdisciplinary and "edgy," in the sense of being cutting edge, or crossing disciplinary, geographical, or chronological boundaries.

Submissions

Proposals or completed projects to be considered for publication should be sent either to Shannon Cunningham (shannon@smcunningham.com), acquisitions editor for projects that fall into the medieval period, or to Erika Gaffney (Erika.Gaffney@arc-humanities.org), acquisitions editor for projects that fall into the early modern period.

Northwestern University Press

Rethinking the Early Modern

Editors

Marcus Keller, Ellen McClure, Feisal Mohamed

Recent theoretical and methodological innovations in the humanities, from queer theory to ecocriticism, have opened numerous new venues for a reexamination of the literatures and cultures of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Indeed they invite us to re-think early modernity. With a focus on the English and French traditions, the books in this series address the question of what early modernity is by pursuing an original approach to early modern literature and culture, putting them into a theoretically informed, productive dialogue with current concerns of humanistic inquiry.

Submissions

Assistant Director/ Senior Editor: Henry L. Carrigan Jr., (847) 491.8112, h-carrigan@northwestern.edu.

Open Book Publishers

Digital Humanities Series: Knowledge, Thought and Practice

Editor

Alessandra Tosi

The invention and application of digital methods, tools and media have had significant effects on scholarly research. They raise new questions about how we conceive knowledge, think about scholarship and develop new epistemic practices, while large-scale digitization projects and hyperactive social media have brought into focus social and historical texts, images and other data formerly difficult or impossible to reach. Overseen by an international board of experts, our Digital Humanities Series: Knowledge, Thought and Practice is dedicated to the exploration of these changes by scholars across disciplines. Books in this series present cutting-edge research that investigate the links between the digital and other disciplines paving the ways for further investigations and applications that take advantage of new digital media to present knowledge in new ways.

Submissions

Proposals in any area of the Digital Humanities are invited. Contact the editor, Alessandra Tosi, a.tosi@openbookpublishers.com to discuss or submit a proposal. See also information for authors.

Oxford University Press

Early Modern Literary Geographies

Editors

Julie Sanders, Garrett A. Sullivan Jr

Influenced by the work of cultural and human geographers, literary scholars have started to attend to the ways in which early modern people constructed their senses of the world out of interactions among places, spaces, and embodied practices. Early Modern Literary Geographies will feature innovative research monographs and agenda-setting essay collections that partake of this "spatial turn." The term "literary geographies" is to be understood capaciously: we invite submissions on any form of early modern writing that engages with the topics of space, place, landscape and environment. Although English literature is at its center, Early Modern Literary Geographies will feature scholarship that abuts a range of disciplines, including geography, history, performance studies, art history, musicology, archaeology and cognitive science. Subjects of inquiry might include cartography or chorography; historical phenomenology and sensory geographies; body and environment; mobility studies; histories of travel or perambulation; regional and provincial literatures; urban studies; performance environments; sites of memory and cognition; ecocriticism; and oceanic or new blue studies.

Submissions

Email the editors in the first instance.

Oxford Shakespeare Topics

Editors

Peter Holland, Stanley Wells

Oxford Shakespeare Topics provide students and teachers with short books on important aspects of Shakespeare criticism and scholarship. Each book is written by an authority in its field, and combines accessible style with original discussion of its subject.

Submissions

Contact series editors in the first instance.

Oxford Textual Perspectives

Editors

Elaine Traherne, Greg Walker

Oxford Textual Perspectives is a new series of informative and provocative studies focused upon literary texts (conceived of in the broadest sense of that term) and the technologies, cultures, and communities that produce, inform, and receive them. It provides fresh interpretations of fundamental works and of the vital and challenging issues emerging in English literary studies. By engaging with the materiality of the literary text, its production, and reception history, and frequently testing and exploring the boundaries of the notion of text itself, the volumes in the series question familiar frameworks and provide innovative interpretations of both canonical and lesser known works.

Submissions

Contact series editors in the first instance.

Palgrave Macmillan

Crossroads of Knowledge in Early Modern Literature

Editors

Subha Mukherji, Rachel E. Holmes, Elizabeth L. Swann, Tim Stuart-Buttle, Rebecca Tomlin

This series rewrites the story of early modern epistemology by examining the intervention of the ‘literary’ in a wider conversation about the process, ethics and psychology of knowing, more obviously ongoing across Theology, Natural Philosophy, Economics and Law. Each volume focuses on a particular interdisciplinary threshold, with literature as a running thread, reading these cognate fields as coeval but distinct, and charting certain elusive and ordinarily unassimilable aspects of the experience and texture of knowing by using a unique interdisciplinary route.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Ben Doyle (b.doyle@palgrave.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Early Modern Cultural Studies

Editors

Ivo Kamps

In the twenty first century, literary criticism, literary theory, historiography and cultural studies have become intimately interwoven, and the formerly distinct fields of literature, society, history, and culture no longer seem so discrete. The Early Modern Cultural Studies series encourages scholarship that crosses boundaries between disciplines, time periods, nations, and theoretical orientations. The series assumes that the early modern period was marked by incipient processes of transculturation brought about through exploration, trade, colonization, and the migration of texts and people. These phenomena set in motion the processes of globalization that remain in force today. The purpose of this series is to publish innovative scholarship that is attentive to the complexity of this early modern world and bold in the methods it employs for studying it. (Previous co-editor: Jean E. Howard.)

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Allie Troyanos (allie.troyanos@palgrave-usa.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Early Modern Literature in History

Editors

Cedric C. Brown, Andrew Hadfield

Within the period 1520-1740, this large, long-running series, with international representation discusses many kinds of writing, both within and outside the established canon. The volumes may employ different theoretical perspectives, but they share an historical awareness and an interest in seeing their texts in lively negotiation with their own and successive cultures.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Ben Doyle (b.doyle@palgrave.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Global Shakespeares

Editors

Alexa Joubin

This series in the innovative Palgrave Pivot format explores the global afterlife of Shakespearean drama, poetry and motifs in its literary, performative and digital forms of expression in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Published within three months of acceptance of final manuscript, these landmark studies of between 25,000 to 50,000 words will capture global Shakespeares as they evolve.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Ben Doyle (b.doyle@palgrave.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

History of Text Technologies

Editors

Gary Taylor, Francois Dupuigrenet Desroussilles, Elizabeth Spiller

This series, developed in conjunction with an interdisciplinary research program at Florida State University, is dedicated to new scholarship and theory in the history of books and, more generally, the transformation of sign systems into engineered objects. This exciting new series moves from the analysis of texts as material objects to the analysis of texts as material agents. It is committed to the recognition that texts cannot be separated from the various and changing technologies through which they are created. Included are analytic bibliography, paleography, and epigraphy, history of authorship, history of reading, study of manuscript and print culture, and history of media. Rather than being a solely historical overview, this series seeks out scholarship that provides a frame for understanding the consequences of both globalism and technology in the circulation of texts, ideas, and human culture.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Megan Laddusaw (megan.laddusaw@palgrave-usa.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Language, Style and Literature

Editors

Rocio Montoro, Paul Simpson

Language, Style and Literature is a new series of books in literary stylistics. The series offers rigorous and informative treatments of particular writers, genres and literary periods and provides in-depth examination of their key stylistic tropes. Every volume in the series is intended to serve as a key reference point for undergraduate and post-graduate students and as an investigative resource for more experienced researchers. The last twenty years have witnessed a huge transformation in the analytic tools and methods of modern stylistics. By harnessing the talent of a growing body of researchers in the field, this series of books seeks both to capture these developments and transformations and to establish and elaborate new analytic models and paradigms.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Cathy Scott (cathy.scott@palgrave.com ) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

The New Antiquity

Editor

Matthew S. Santirocco

Over the past two decades, our understanding of the ancient world has been dramatically transformed as classicists and other scholars of antiquity have moved beyond traditional geographical, chronological, and methodological boundaries to focus on new topics and different questions. By providing a major venue for further cutting-edge scholarship, The New Antiquity will reflect, shape, and participate in this transformation. The series will focus on the literature, history, thought, and material culture of not only ancient Europe, but also Egypt, the Middle East, and the Far East. With an emphasis also on the reception of the ancient world into later periods, The New Antiquity will reveal how present concerns can be brilliantly illuminated by this new understanding of the past.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Tomas Rene (t.rene@palgrave.com) to discuss your proposal and/or submit a proposal.

New Directions in Book History

Editors

Shafquat Towheed, Jonathan Rose

As a vital field of scholarship, book history has now reached a stage of maturity where its early work can be reassessed and built upon. That is the goal of New Directions in Book History. This series will publish monographs in English that employ advanced methods and open up new frontiers in research, written by younger, mid-career, and senior scholars. Its scope is global, extending to the Western and non-Western worlds and to all historical periods from antiquity to the 21st century, including studies of script, print, and post-print cultures. New Directions in Book History, then, will be broadly inclusive but always in the vanguard. It will experiment with inventive methodologies, explore unexplored archives, debate overlooked issues, challenge prevailing theories, study neglected subjects, and demonstrate the relevance of book history to other academic fields. Every title in this series will address the evolution of the historiography of the book, and every one will point to new directions in book scholarship.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Ben Doyle (b.doyle@palgrave.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

The New Middle Ages

Editor

Bonnie Wheeler

The New Middle Ages is a series dedicated to pluridisciplinary studies of medieval cultures, with particular emphasis on recuperating women’s history and on feminist and gender analyses. This peer-reviewed series includes both scholarly monographs and essay collections.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Allie Troyanos (allie.troyanos@palgrave-usa.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

New Transculturalisms, 1400–1800

Editors

Ann Rosalind Jones, Jyotsna Singh, Mihoko Suzuki

This series, now published by Palgrave Macmillan, presents studies of early modern contacts and exchanges among the states, polities, cultures, religions, and entrepreneurial organizations of Europe; Asia, including the Levant and East India/Indies; Africa; and the Americas. Books in New Transculturalisms will continue to investigate diverse figures, such as travelers, merchants, cultural inventors—explorers, mapmakers, artists, craftsmen, and writers -- as they operated in political, mercantile, sexual, affective, and linguistic economies. We encourage authors to reflect on their own methodologies in relation to issues and theories relevant to the study of transculturalism, translation, and transnationalism.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Megan Laddusaw (megan.laddusaw@palgrave-usa.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Palgrave Shakespeare Studies

Editors

Dympna Callaghan, Michael Dobson

Palgrave Shakespeare Studies takes Shakespeare as its focus but strives to understand the significance of his oeuvre in relation to his contemporaries, subsequent writers and historical and political contexts. By extending the scope of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Studies the series will open up the field to examinations of previously neglected aspects or sources in the period's art and thought. Titles in the Palgrave Shakespeare Studies series seek to understand anew both where the literary achievements of the English Renaissance came from and where they have brought us.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Ben Doyle (b.doyle@palgrave.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Palgrave Studies in Theatre and Performance History

Editor

Don B. Wilmeth

Palgrave Studies in Theatre and Performance History is a series devoted to the best of theatre/performance scholarship currently available, accessible and free of jargon. It strives to include a wide range of topics, from the more traditional to those performance forms that in recent years have helped broaden the understanding of what theatre as a category might include (from variety forms as diverse as the circus and burlesque to street buskers, stage magic, and musical theatre, among many others). Although historical, critical, or analytical studies are of special interest, more theoretical projects, if not the dominant thrust of a study but utilized as important underpinning or as an historiographical or analytical method of exploration, are also of interest. Textual studies of drama or other types of less traditional performance texts are also germane to the series if placed in their cultural, historical, social, or political and economic context. There is no geographical focus for this series and works of excellence of a diverse and international nature, including comparative studies, are sought.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Tomas Rene (t.rene@palgrave.com) to discuss your proposal and/or submit a proposal.

Reproducing Shakespeare

Editors

Thomas Cartelli, Katherine Rowe

Reproducing Shakespeare marks the turn in adaptation studies towards recontextualization, re-formatting, and media convergence. It builds on two decades of growing interest in the 'afterlife' of Shakespeare, showcasing some of the best new work in this kind now being produced. The series addresses the repurposing of Shakespeare in different technical, cultural, and performance formats, emphasizing the uses and effects of Shakespearean texts in both national and global networks of reference and communication. Studies in this series pursue a deeper understanding of how and why cultures recycle their classic works, and of the media involved in negotiating these transactions.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor, Allie Troyanos (allie.troyanos@palgrave-usa.com) to discuss and/or submit a proposal.

Shakespeare in Practice

Editors

Stuart Hampton-Reeves, Bridget Escolme

The books in this series chart new directions for a performance approach to Shakespeare, representing the diverse and exciting work being undertaken by a new generation of Shakespeareans and combining insights from both scholarship and theatrical practice.

Submissions

To propose a title in this series, contact the series editors or Jenna Steventon (j.steventon@palgrave.com), Head of Humanities for Palgrave's textbook publishing.

Pennsylvania State University Press

Medieval & Renaissance Literary Studies

Editor

Michael Wolfe

The Early Modern Studies series includes titles in history, art history, church history, philosophy, literature, and interdisciplinary studies, covering the period from approximately 1450 to 1680. This series was first established by the Sixteenth Century Studies Conference in the 1980s and was known as the Sixteenth Century Essays & Studies series until it was replaced in 2008. (The series was formerly published by Truman State University Press.)

Submissions

Contact Kendra Boileau, PSUP Editor-in-Chief, klb60@psu.edu.

Medieval & Renaissance Literary Studies

Editor

Rebecca Totaro

Medieval & Renaissance Literary Studies (MRLS) seeks to promote the study of late medieval, Renaissance and seventeenth century English literature by publishing scholarly and critical monographs, collections of essays, editions and bibliographies. Of particular interest are works concerning Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne and Milton. The series encourages a broad range of interpretation, including the relationship of literature and its cultural contexts, close textual analysis, and the use of contemporary critical methodologies. (The series was formerly published by Duquesne University Press.)

Submissions

Contact Rebecca Totaro, rtotaro@fgcu.edu and/or Kendra Boileau, PSUP Editor-in-Chief, klb60@psu.edu.

Penn State Series in the History of the Book

Editor

James L. W. West III

This series publishes books that employ a mixture of approaches: historical, archival, biographical, critical, sociological, and economic. Topics include professional authorship and the literary marketplace, the history of reading and book distribution, book-trade studies and publishing-house histories, and examinations of copyright and literary property.

Submissions

Patrick Alexander (Director), pha3@psu.edu.

Peter Lang

Britannia

Editors

Jürgen Klein, Christoph Houswitschka

Britannia: Texts in English publishes studies of English texts as literature, culture, and history, from the Middle Ages to the present. The series includes monographs, essay collections, reference works, and edited anthologies of primary materials, in German and English.

Submissions

Submit online via publishing proposal form.

Court Cultures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance

Editor

Sarah Alyn Stacey

Court Cultures of the Middle Ages and Renaissance is a peer-reviewed series focused on the inter- and multi-disciplinary cultural output of medieval and Renaissance court culture on an international scale. The series invites proposals for single- and multi-authored monographs, edited collections and editions of early works relating to the court. Prospective authors are encouraged to submit proposals which highlight the central importance of the court to medieval and Renaissance culture, including projects that explore the life and/or works of writers, artists, historiographers, soldiers, composers, diplomats and courtiers, in the East as well as the West. Other areas of particular interest are courtly ritual (e.g. chivalric code, ceremonies, spectacle) and literary and artistic representations of the court. The series will also explore the role of the court in shaping national, religious and political identities, as well as its function as an interface between different cultures. Each proposal will be vetted by the specialists on the series editorial board and will undergo a comprehensive peer-review process. (The series replaces the earlier Medieval and Renaissance Court Cultures series published by Brepols.)

Submissions

Please email a c.500 word abstract to the editor, Dr Sarah Alyn Stacey (salynsta@tcd.ie), in the first instance. Formal proposals may be submitted online using the Peter Lang publishing proposal form.

Medieval Interventions: New Light on Traditional Thinking

Editor

Stephen G. Nichols

Medieval Interventions publishes innovative studies on medieval culture broadly conceived. By «innovative», we envisage works espousing, for example, new research protocols especially those involving digitized resources, revisionist approaches to codicology and paleography, reflections on medieval ideologies, fresh pedagogical practices, digital humanities, advances in gender studies, as well as fresh thinking on animal, environmental, geospatial, and nature studies. In short, the series will seek to set rather than follow agendas in the study of medieval culture. Since medieval intellectual and artistic practices were naturally interdisciplinary, the series welcomes studies from across the humanities and social sciences. Recognizing also the vigor that marks the field worldwide, the series endeavors to publish work in translation from non-Anglophone medievalists.

Submissions

Submit online via publishing proposal form.

Printing History and Culture

Editors

Caroline Archer-Parre, Malcolm Dick, John Hinks

This series unites the allied fields of printing history and print culture, and is therefore concerned not only with the design, production and distribution of printed material but also its consumption, reception and impact. It includes the histories of the machinery and equipment, of the industry and its personnel, of the printing processes, the design of its artefacts (books, newspapers, journals, fine prints, and ephemera) and with the related arts and crafts, including calligraphy, type-founding, typography, papermaking, bookbinding, illustration, and publishing. It also covers the cultural context and environment in which print was produced and consumed.

Submissions

Submit online via publishing proposal form.

Renaissance and Baroque Studies and Texts

Editor

Eckhard Bernstein

The Renaissance and Baroque Studies and Texts series deals with various aspects of the European Renaissance and Baroque. Studies on the history, literature, philosophy, and the visual arts of these periods are welcome. The series also will consider translations of important works, especially from Latin into English. These translations should, however, include a substantial introduction and notes. Books in the series will include original monographs as well as revised or reconceived dissertations.

Submissions

Submit online via publishing proposal form.

Studies in Shakespeare

Editor

Robert F. Wilson, Jr.

The Studies in Shakespeare series deals with all aspects of Shakespearean drama and poetry. Studies of dramatic verse, verse and prose style, major themes, stage or performance history, and film treatments are welcomed. The editor is particularly interested in manuscripts that examine Shakespeare's work in its American setting -- in the academy, on stage, and in popular culture.

Submissions

Submit online via publishing proposal form.

Punctum Books

Dead Letter Office

Editor

Eileen Joy

Dead Letter Office publishes small chapbook-style works, of anywhere from 50 to 100 or so pages, representing work that either has gone "nowhere" or will likely go nowhere, yet this work retains little inkdrops of possibility and beauty and the darkling shape of a more full-bodied form and structure -- to whit: the conference or seminar paper that will never become an article, the stray pages for a half-baked article that will never become the full-baked article, the half-finished chapter that will never make it into the book or the dissertation, the outlines and notes and semi-polished pages for manuscripts that are simply unfinish-able, the essay that can find no welcoming harbor (and that you half-suspect is ill-conceived but likely isn't), the prospectus for the project you can never seem to find your way to start, the prolegomenon and preamble without follow-up, the stray children of your pen, the letter you wrote then tucked away in a drawer, fearing to mail it, or the one you sent and received again, with the stamp, "return to sender," or which was never received nor returned, that you perhaps lost (then re-found). We seek, also, experiments in whimsy, in over-reaching, in idle speculation, in prospecting for fool's gold, in working molehills into mountains, in marking and then forgetting a path in a wild wood of visible darkness. In short, the Dead Letter Office invites you to take those letters out of the drawer or shoebox, to re-visit and re-polish them, without worrying about conclusions or ultimate destinations, and send them to us. We also invite work whose genre is so un-classifiable, it is often declared "Dead On Arrival" in the more traditional publishing houses. Finally, we will also consider actual letters to the dead: belated eulogies, posthumous transmissions to the underworld, love (and hate and other) missives to the departed, funerary telegrams, and various notes and commentaries to be used as devices to water the graveyards where, to cadge from Walter Benjamin, some of the dead are turning by a strange heliotropism toward the sun that is rising in the sky of history.

Submissions

Contact either or both of the Acquisitions Co-Directors, Eileen Joy (eileen@punctumbooks.com) and Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei (vincent@punctumbooks.com) with an abstract (~500 to ~1,000 words).

Routledge

Anglo-Italian Renaissance Studies

Editor

Michele Marrapodi

This series aims to place early modern English drama within the context of the European Renaissance and, more specifically, within the context of Italian cultural, dramatic, and literary traditions, with reference to the impact and influence of both classical and contemporary culture. Among the various forms of influence, the series considers early modern Italian novellas, theatre, and discourses as direct or indirect sources, analogues and paralogues for the construction of Shakespeare's drama, particularly in the comedies, romances, and other Italianate plays. Critical analysis focusing on other cultural transactions, such as travel and courtesy books, the arts, fencing, dancing, and fashion, will also be encompassed within the scope of the series. Special attention is paid to the manner in which early modern English dramatists adapted Italian materials to suit their theatrical agendas, creating new forms, and stretching the Renaissance practice of contaminatio to achieve, even if unconsciously, a process of rewriting, remaking, and refashioning of 'alien' cultures. The series welcomes both single-author studies and collections of essays and invites proposals that take into account the transition of cultures between the two countries as a bilateral process, paying attention also to the penetration of early modern English culture into the Italian world.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities

Editors

Marilyn Deegan, Lorna Hughes, Andrew Prescott, Harold Short

Digital technologies are increasingly important to arts and humanities research, expanding the horizons of research methods in all aspects of data capture, investigation, analysis, modelling, presentation and dissemination. This series, one of the first and most highly regarded in the field, covers a wide range of disciplines and provides an authoritative reflection of the 'state of the art' in the application of computing and technology. The titles in this peer-reviewed series are critical reading not just for experts in digital humanities and technology issues, but for all scholars working in arts and humanities who need to understand the issues around digital research.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

Editors

Mary Thomas Crane, Henry S. Turner

For more than a decade now, Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity has provided a forum for groundbreaking work on the relations between literary and scientific discourses in Europe, during a period when both fields were in a crucial moment of historical formation. We welcome proposals that address the many overlaps between modes of imaginative writing typical of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries–poetics, rhetoric, prose narrative, dramatic production, utopia–and the vocabularies, conceptual models, and intellectual methods of newly emergent 'scientific' fields such as medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, psychology, mapping, mathematics, or natural history. In order to reflect the nature of intellectual inquiry during the period, the series is interdisciplinary in orientation and publishes monographs, edited collections, and selected critical editions of primary texts relevant to an understanding of the mutual implication of literary and scientific epistemologies.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Material Readings in Early Modern Culture

Editors

James Daybell, Adam Smyth

his series provides a forum for studies that consider the material forms of texts as part of an investigation into the culture of early modern England. The editors invite proposals of a multi- or interdisciplinary nature, and particularly welcome proposals that combine archival research with an attention to the theoretical models that might illuminate the reading, writing, and making of texts, as well as projects that take innovative approaches to the study of material texts, both in terms the kinds of primary materials under investigation, and in terms of methodologies. What are the questions that have yet to be asked about writing in its various possible embodied forms? Are there varieties of materiality that are critically neglected? How does form mediate and negotiate content? In what ways do the physical features of texts inform how they are read, interpreted and situated? Consideration will be given to both monographs and collections of essays. The range of topics covered in this series includes, but is not limited to: History of the book, publishing, the book trade, printing, typography (layout, type, typeface, blank/white space, paratextual apparatus); Technologies of the written word: ink, paper, watermarks, pens, presses; Surprising or neglected material forms of writing; Print culture; Manuscript studies; Social space, context, location of writing; Social signs, cues, codes imbued within the material forms of texts; Ownership and the social practices of reading: marginalia, libraries, environments of reading and reception; Codicology, palaeography and critical bibliography; Production, transmission, distribution and circulation; Archiving and the archaeology of knowledge; Orality and oral culture; and, the material text as object or thing.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Non-canonical Early Modern Popular Texts

Editor

John Simons

In recent years it has become broadly accepted that the central texts of English literature do not provide adequate materials for the critical study of the history of literary production and readership, a subject of growing interest. However, the availability of other texts, particularly from the early modern period, remains very limited. This series is designed to meet the demand for modern editions of non-canonical texts, concentrating on the period c.1580-c.1650.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Perspectives on the Non-Human in Literature and Culture

Editor

Karen Raber

In recent years, many disciplines within the humanities have become increasingly concerned with non-human actors and entities. The environment, animals, machines, objects, weather, and other non-human beings and things have taken center stage to challenge assumptions about what we have traditionally called "the human." Informed by theoretical approaches like posthumanism, the new materialisms, (including Actor Network Theory, Object-Oriented Ontology, and similar approaches) ecocriticism, and critical animal studies, such scholarship has until now had no separate and identifiable collective home at an academic press. This series will provide that home, publishing work that shares a concern with the non-human in literary and cultural studies. The series invites single-authored books and essay collections that focus primarily on literary texts, but from an interdisciplinary, theoretically-informed perspective; it will include work that crosses geographical and period boundaries. Titles are characterized by dynamic interventions into established subjects and innovative studies on emerging topics.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Routledge New Textual Studies in Literature

Editors

Kevin Killeen, Bonnie Latimer, Jane Potter

The Routledge New Textual Studies in Literature series seeks to shift the priorities of existing scholarship within the field, producing ground-breaking studies using archives, manuscripts, papers, collections, digital and facsimile collections, and all forms of primary texts and material. It will capitalise on the opportunity represented by the unprecedented wealth of primary materials now available to scholars working across this broad period. Amongst other things, the outputs in this series might: Reappraise canonical authors or movements in relation to new or overlooked archival evidence, asking how the canon might look different in light of this; Re-evaluate a well-known genre, movement, or idea through attention to a wide range of texts or primary material; Exploit and explore the rich variety of texts and primary sources now available digitally or in newly accessible physical archives; Build on the work of new print editions; Focus on manuscripts, letters, personal papers, or ephemera to challenge and reshape existing scholarship; and, Articulate new and fresh methodological approaches to archival, digital-archival, or textual material. Books in this series will transform our understanding of the canon or of standard narratives of literary and cultural history by drawing upon primary materials, especially those that are rare, manuscript, out-of-print, ignored, commonly overlooked, or newly available.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance.

Routledge Studies in Renaissance and Early Modern Worlds of Knowledge

Editor

Harald E. Braun

This series explores Renaissance and Early Modern worlds of knowledge (c.1400-c.1700) in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. The volumes published in this series study the individuals, communities and networks involved in making and communicating knowledge during the first age of globalization. Authors investigate the perceptions, practices and modes of behaviour which shaped Renaissance and Early Modern intellectual endeavour and examine the ways in which they reverberated in the political, cultural, social and economic sphere. The series is interdisciplinary, comparative and global in its outlook. We welcome submissions from new as well as existing fields of Renaissance Studies, including the history of literature (including neo-Latin, European and non-European languages), science and medicine, religion, architecture, environmental and economic history, the history of the book, art history, intellectual history and the history of music. We are particularly interested in proposals that straddle disciplines and are innovative in terms of approach and methodology.

Submissions

The series includes monographs, shorter works and edited collections of essays. The Society for Renaissance Studies (http://www.rensoc.org.uk) provides an expert editorial board, mentoring, extensive editing and support for contributors to the series, ensuring high standards of peer-reviewed scholarship. We welcome proposals from early career researchers as well as more established colleagues. If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact the History Editor, Max Novick (max.novick@taylorandfrancis.com), and the Series Editor, Harald Braun (h.e.braun@liv.ac.uk).

Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture

From Shakespeare to Jonson, Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture looks at both the literature and culture of the early modern period. This series is our home for cutting-edge, upper-level scholarly studies and edited collections. Considering literature alongside theatre, popular culture, race, gender, ecology, space, and other subjects, titles are characterized by dynamic interventions into established subjects and innovative studies on emerging topics.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor Polly Dodson polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk and see submitting a book proposal.

Routledge Studies in Shakespeare

This series is our home for cutting-edge, upper-level scholarly studies and edited collections. Considering Shakespeare alongside topics such as religion, politics, gender, race, ecology, popular culture, and history, titles are characterized by dynamic interventions into established subjects and innovative studies on emerging topics.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor Polly Dodson polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk and see submitting a book proposal.

Studies in Early Modern English Literature

Editor

Richard Bradford

The series focuses on literary writing of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Its objectives are to examine the individuals, trends, and channels of influence of the period between the Renaissance and the rise of Romanticism. During this period the English novel was invented, poetry began to tackle its unsteady relationship with non-literary discourse, and post-Shakespearean drama reinvented itself. Alongside studies of established figures, the series aims to include books on important but lesser-known writers and those who are acknowledged as significant but given slight attention: typically, William Cartwright, James Shirley, John Denham, Edmund Waller, Isaac Watts, Matthew Prior, William D. Avenant, Mark Akenside and John Dyer. Also of particular interest are studies of the development of literary criticism in this period, monographs which deal with the conditions and practicalities of writing including the practices of the publishing trade and financial and social circumstances of writing as a profession and books which give special attention to the relationship between literature and other arts and discourses. Monographs on a variety of writers and topics will be accepted; authors are invited to combine the best traditions of detailed research with astute critical analysis. The use of contemporary theoretical approaches will be acceptable, but every book will be founded primarily upon historical, biographical and textual scholarship.

Submissions

Email the commissioning editor Polly Dodson polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk and see submitting a book proposal.

Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama

Editor

Helen Ostovich

This series presents original research on theater histories and performance histories in early modern England; the time period covered is from about 1500 to the early 18th century. Studies in which women's activities are a central feature of discussion are especially of interest; this may include women as financial or technical support (patrons, musicians, dancers, seamstresses, wig-makers) or house support staff (e.g., gatherers), rather than performance per se. We also welcome critiques of early modern drama that take into account the production values of the plays and rely on period records of performance.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Studies in Publishing History: Manuscript, Print, Digital

Editors

Ann R. Hawkins, Maura Ives

Exploring the intersection of publishing history, book history, and literary and cultural studies, this series supports innovative work on the cultural significance and creative impact of printing and publishing history, including reception, distribution, and translation or adaptation into other media. Proposals are welcome for interdisciplinary and comparative studies by humanities scholars and librarians working in a variety of fields, including literature; book history, periodicals history, and print culture and the sociology of texts; theater, film, and performance studies; library history; history; gender studies; and cultural studies. Topics might include, among other possibilities, publishing histories of major figures or works, of regions, of genres, or studies of particular publishers or practices (including production, distribution, and reception) that hold special aesthetic, social, or political significance. We especially welcome focused argument-driven work that investigates and historicizes new or hybrid forms of text creation and dissemination, including nonprint materials, informal, specialized or private reception and distribution networks, the translation of TV and movies into print, and multimedia publishing practices. (Continues the Pickering and Chatto History of the Book series.)

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Transculturalisms, 1400-1700

Editors

Mihoko Suzuki, Ann Rosalind Jones, Jyotsna Singh

This series presents studies of the early modern contacts and exchanges among the states, polities and entrepreneurial organizations of Europe; Asia, including the Levant and East India/Indies; Africa; and the Americas. Books investigate travellers, merchants and cultural inventors, including explorers, mapmakers, artists and writers, as they operated in political, mercantile, sexual and linguistic economies. We encourage authors to reflect on their own methodologies in relation to issues and theories relevant to the study of transculturism/translation and transnationalism. We are particularly interested in work on and from the perspective of the Asians, Africans, and Americans involved in these interactions, and on such topics as: Material exchanges, including textiles, paper and printing, and technologies of knowledge; Movements of bodies: embassies, voyagers, piracy, enslavement; Travel writing: its purposes, practices, forms and effects on writing in other genres; Belief systems: religions, philosophies, sciences; Translations: verbal, artistic, philosophical; Forms of transnational violence and its representations.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Women and Gender in the Early Modern World

Editors

Allyson Poska, Abby Zanger

The study of women and gender offers some of the most vital and innovative challenges to current scholarship on the early modern period. For more than a decade now, Women and Gender in the Early Modern World has served as a forum for presenting fresh ideas and original approaches to the field. Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary in scope, this Routledge series strives to reach beyond geographical limitations to explore the experiences of early modern women and the nature of gender in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa. We welcome proposals for both single-author volumes and edited collections which expand and develop this continually evolving field of study.

Submissions

Contact the Senior Editor, Polly Dodson, polly.dodson@tandf.co.uk.

Stanford University Press

Stanford Text Technologies

Editors

Elaine Treharne, Ruth Ahnert

Among the most important and dynamic areas of scholarship and general public engagement in the last decade are the History of the Book and Digital Humanities. The Text Technologies series seeks ambitious and innovative research at the intersection of these two flourishing areas. Emerging from the Stanford project of the same name (https://texttechnologies.stanford.edu), this series aspires to chart the long history of text -- in its most capacious definition, from the earliest cave paintings to scrolls to books to computer code -- on a technological continuum. Books in this series are concerned with manuscript and print media, including inscription, photography, graffiti, books, tattoo, textual ephemera, and trends in text technological developments generally, with a particular focus on today's digital environment.

Submissions

Contact the series editors in the first instance. See also information for authors.

University of Delaware Press

Early Modern Exchange

Editors

Gary Ferguson, Meredith K. Ray

The Early Modern Exchange publishes studies of European literature and culture (c. 1450-1700) exploring connections across intellectual, geographical, social, and cultural boundaries: trans-national, trans-regional engagements (e.g. Europe and the Americas or the Ottoman Turks, France and Spain, Italy and Dalmatia); networks and processes for the development and dissemination of knowledges and practices; gendered and sexual roles and hierarchies and the effects of their transgression; relations between different ethnic or religious groups; travel and migration; textual circulation/s. The series welcomes critical approaches to multiple disciplines (literature and law, philosophy, science, medicine, music) and objects (e.g. print and material culture, the visual arts, architecture), the re-examination of historiographical categories (medieval, early modern, modern), and the investigation of resonances across broad temporal spans.

Submissions

Submission guidelines.

University of Illinois Press

Topics in the Digital Humanities

Editors

Susan Schreibman, Raymond G. Siemens

Humanities computing is undergoing a redefinition of basic principles by a continuous influx of new, vibrant, and diverse communities or practitioners within and well beyond the halls of academe. These practitioners recognize the value computers add to their work, that the computer itself remains an instrument subject to continual innovation, and that competition within many disciplines requires scholars to become and remain current with what computers can do. Topics in the Digital Humanities invites manuscripts that will advance and deepen knowledge and activity in this new and innovative field.

Submissions

Contact Dawn Durante, Senior Acquisitions Editor, on durante9@uillinois.edu. See also book proposal guidelines.

University of Iowa Press

Impressions: Studies in the Art, Culture, and Future of Books

Editor

Matthew P. Brown

In our moment of media shift, both book history and the book arts are especially well-poised to investigate text-making, to understand its past, comprehend its present, and navigate its future. The Impressions series invites works with practice, whether digitally oriented or hand based, as their focus. It seeks writing that critically eyes the cultural contexts and trade economies shaping book practice as well as writing that carefully appreciates the active ways in which a maker's choices remake culture.

Submissions

Contact the series editor, Matthew P. Brown, matthew-p-brown@uiowa.edu.

University of Massachusetts Press

Massachusetts Studies in Early Modern Culture

Editor

Arthur F. Kinney

This series seeks to publish substantive critical and scholarly works, in any field of intellectual endeavor, that significantly advance and refigure our knowledge of Tudor and Stuart England.

Submissions

Please direct manuscript inquiries to: Mary Dougherty, Director, mvdougherty@umass.edu.

Studies in Print Culture and the History of the Book

Editors

Greg Barnhisel, Robert A. Gross, Joan Shelley Rubin, Michael Winship

This series includes a substantial list of books on the history of print culture, authorship, reading, writing, printing, and publishing. The editors are especially interested in interdisciplinary work and invite submissions from scholars in history, literary studies, bibliography, and related fields who are working in this area.

Submissions

Please direct manuscript inquiries to: Brian Halley, Editor, brian.halley@umb.edu.

University of Michigan Press

Cultures of Knowledge in the Early Modern World

Editors

Jacob Soll, Ann Blair, Anthony Grafton

The series Cultures of Knowledge in the Early Modern World examines the intersection of encyclopedic, natural, historical and literary knowledge in the early modern world, incorporating both theory (philosophies of knowledge and authority) and practice (collection, observation, information handling, travel, experiment and their social and political contexts). Interdisciplinary in nature, the goal of the series is to promote works that illustrate international and interreligious intellectual exchange and the intersections of different fields and traditions of knowledge.

Submissions

See for authors and prospective authors.

Digital Humanities@digitalculturebooks

Editors

Julie Thompson Klein, Tara McPherson, Tom Finholt

digitalculturebooks is an imprint of the University of Michigan Press dedicated to publishing innovative work in new media studies and digital humanities. We began in 2006 as a partnership between MLibrary and the Press, taking advantage of the skills and expertise of staff throughout Michigan Publishing. Our primary goal is to be an incubator for new publishing models in the humanities and social sciences. The Digital Humanities@digitalculturebooks series will provide a forum for ground-breaking and benchmark work in digital humanities. This rapidly growing field lies at the intersections of computers and the disciplines of the arts and humanities, the professions of education and of library and information science, and the fields of media and communications studies, and cultural studies. The purpose of the series is to feature rigorous research that advances understanding of the nature and implications of the changing relationship between humanities and digital technologies. Books, monographs, and experimental formats that define current practices, emergent trends, and future directions will receive priority. Together, they will illuminate the varied disciplinary and professional forms, broad multidisciplinary scope, interdisciplinary dynamics, and transdisciplinary potential of the field.

Submissions

Submit a proposal as outlined on the For Authors page to the Editorial Director, Mary Francis (mfranci@umich.edu).

Editorial Theory and Literary Criticism

Editor

George Bornstein

Editorial theory has always been an important aspect of literary study. Recently, it has also become a significant part of the newer forms of literary theory and criticism, as earlier views of editing as providing final authorial intention have been reexamined and challenged. Although various individual books on the subject of editing have appeared, there has not been a series to gather together the best scholarship in the field and examine the various issues and controversies surrounding it. The Editorial Theory and Literary Criticism series has been designed to fill that need.

Submissions

See for authors and prospective authors.

University of Minnesota Press

Debates in the Digital Humanities

Editors

Matthew K. Gold, Lauren F. Klein

As those within and outside of digital humanities struggle to make sense of the field and to articulate how itmight mesh with existing structures and practices, the debates in and around the digital humanities have mounted in both significance and scope. Resonating with established middle-state initiatives, the Debates in the Digital Humanities series forms a group of interconnected publication ventures that will encompass the current open-access platform for the book, new print publications centered around topics of specific import, and a biennial volume that takes account of major issues of debate. By identifying unifying issues and ideas as they unfold and by offering a hybrid model for open-access texts to be published in both experimental online spaces and traditional print forms, the editors will provide necessary structure to a rapidly expanding field, documenting the digital humanities' present debates and shaping its future.

Submissions

Contact Danielle Kasprzak, Humanities Editor, on kasp0079@umn.edu. See book proposal guidelines.

University of Nebraska Press

Early Modern Cultural Studies

Editors

Carole Levin, Marguerite Tassi

Early Modern Cultural Studies Series is an interdisciplinary series that will publish books that examine a wide range of aesthetic works and moments in their original cultural milieu. The series is interested in questions about a rapidly changing world where politics, religion, national identity, and gender roles were all subjects of contestation and redefinition, focusing on a broad definition of the early modern period which encompasses the fifteenth to the eighteenth century. This would include, for example, the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries as the products of the burgeoning theatrical industry, designed for the entertainment of heterogeneous audiences who lived in a rapidly changing world where politics, religion, national identity, and gender roles were all subjects of contestation and redefinition. Manuscripts will be chosen from fields including but not limited to, literature, history, philosophy, religion and political science, in order to enable a truly multifaceted understanding of the early modern period.

Submissions

See submitting a proposal and contact Alisa Plant, Acquiring Editor, aplant2@unl.edu.

University of Notre Dame Press

ReFormations: Medieval and Early Modern

Editors

David Aers, Sarah Beckwith, James Simpson

ReFormations: Medieval and Early Modern interrogates and challenges the ways in which the academy has divided the study of early English literature and its history into two separate, almost incommensurate realms, medieval and early modern. The series is reforming this practice by publishing a range of literary, historical, and cultural works that will move easily across old divisions.

Submissions

Submit a proposal to the acquisitions department.

University of Pennsylvania Press

Alembics: Penn Studies in Literature and Science

Editors

Mary Thomas Crane, Henry S. Turner

Alembics: Penn Studies in Literature and Science seeks to publish the best work emerging at the intersections between literature and science from the medieval period to the future, focusing on scholarship that shows us how "literary" and "scientific" modes of representation and methods of argument came to be constituted historically through a shared attention to common problems.

Submissions

Jerome E. Singerman, Senior Humanities Editor, singerma@upenn.edu.

Material Texts

Editors

Roger Chartier, Joseph Farrell, Anthony Grafton, Leah Price, Peter Stallybrass, Michael F. Suarez

Material Texts explores cultural technologies of communication—books, manuscripts, scrolls, films, graffiti, the actor's voice—with particular attention to the ways specific material forms affect meaning.

Submissions

Jerome E. Singerman, Senior Humanities Editor, singerma@upenn.edu.

University of Toronto Press

Studies in Book and Print Culture

Editor

Leslie Howsam

Book history has proven to be an exciting and dynamic meeting ground for a range of ideas and methodological approaches. Historians, literary scholars, librarians, bibliographers, and others have all begun to discuss the historical circumstances of literary production and reception, examining not only those who wrote and read, but those who produced, distributed, and sold books and print materials, as well as the physical objects themselves. Studies in Book and Print Culture is international and interdisciplinary in scope. The series includes studies of literary history, historical bibliography, textual editing, studies of authorship and publishing, and analyses of reading, literacy, and print culture.

Submissions

Submission guidelines.


© 2011– Brett Greatley-Hirsch